Category: Motorcycle News

Suzuki GSX-S1000 Available In New Colour Scheme

Suzuki GSX-S1000 Available In New Colour Scheme

The Suzuki GSX-S1000F will be available in a new Candy Red/Sparkle Black colour scheme from later this month. The colour scheme is in addition to the existing Metallic Triton Blue and Metallic Matte Grey variants. The GSX-S1000F has become popular since its launch in Australia last August because of its combination of supersport performance and street riding comfort. The bike is based around the Suzuki GSX-R1000 “K5” model from 2005 which was well regarded as having one of the best engines in its class at the time. The engine of the K5 utilized a long-stroke design that provided quick-revving midrange torque, which made it a good choice as the starting point for the GSX-S1000 range. Suzuki revised the engine with lighter pistons, a drop in the compression ratio, a new cylinder head with revised intake and exhaust ports, and milder cams to give the engine better mid range power. It also dropped the expensive titanium valves from the GSX-R in favour of steel valves to reduce costs. The end result is an engine that still gives the excitement that comes with a performance sport bike but is far better suited to real world riding. Suzuki wrapped the engine in a compact and lightweight frame, and designed the suspension to be direct but plush. The GSX-S1000F has a three-mode traction control system and uses the same Brembo brake calipers with ABS as the GSX-R1000. The Suzuki GSX-S1000F is a good choice for someone looking for a bike that is comfortable and practical yet still has plenty of performance and sports bike good looks. Limited quantities of the new GSX-S1000F will be available, and Suzuki Australia is advising interested customers to pre-order via their local Suzuki dealer. Recommended retail price remains unchanged at just $17,290 ride away.

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Changes To Vehicle Import Laws To Impact Motorcycle Industry

Changes To Vehicle Import Laws To Impact Motorcycle Industry

Changes to the vehicle import laws from 2018 will also have an impact on the motorcycle industry. The industry has now had some time to assess the consequences of the shock announcement made a couple of weeks ago. Initial reaction to the changes has been harsh, with many organisations including the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries slamming the decision as potentially dangerous for individuals and damaging for the industry. Under the new laws, an individual will be able to import one vehicle every 24 months from right-hand-drive countries with “comparable vehicle standards to Australia”. The vehicle must have less than 500km on the odometer and be less than 12 months old. Any imported vehicle is to be inspected by an independent third-party, and recorded on an online Register of Approved Vehicles. For cars that will allow the import of vehicles from Japan and the United Kingdom only, but it may open the door to many more countries for motorcycles. There has been plenty of discussion since the changes were announced, and the major concerns are centred around safety and service. Because the Australian motorcycle market is fairly small on a global scale, many of the new models sold through dealerships here are identical or at least very close to overseas models. The government has relaxed laws in recent years to remove certain requirements specific to the Australian market to bring the models sold in Australia even more in line with overseas models. That has included removing the restriction on rear mudguards that required manufacturers to fit extensions to the mudguard to meet Australian laws. All this means the safety concerns may not be an issue as long as the regulations are enforced. But buyers must remember that a lot can happen to a motorcycle in 500km, and checking its history is essential. While the changes will allow individuals to import models not currently brought into the country by the major importers, private importers are likely to have issues with service and support. Australian motorcycle importers and their dealership networks are rightfully protective of their businesses, and bikes not sold through their network may not receive the same level of service. Warranty claims, vehicle recalls and parts availability are just some of the potential issues. And there is the question of whether all the effort required to import a bike is worth it.

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Yamaha MT-10 Specifications Announced

Yamaha MT-10 Specifications Announced

Yamaha has released more detailed information on its upcoming MT-10. Specifications of the new naked bike, especially its power and torque figures, have been kept under wraps since the bike was unveiled in Milan last November. We already knew the MT-10 was based on the YZF-R1S, a slightly down spec and cheaper version of the R1 primarily sold into the US. The MT-10 uses the same main frame, swingarm, suspension and wheels as the R1S, and the engine has been retuned to give better mid-range responsiveness. The engine in the MT-10 has newly designed intake, exhaust and fuelling systems. It also uses the steel conrods from the R1S rather than the titanium ones used in the standard R1. Engine performance figures have also been released. The MT-10 powerplant  generates 118kW at 11,500rpm and 111nm at 9,000rpm. The electronics package is very similar but missing the Inertial Measurement Unit. The MT-10 also has three selectable rider modes, three levels of traction control and ABS. There’s also cruise control, Yamaha’s Slip & Assist clutch, and a full LCD instrument cluster. Total kerb (wet) weight of the MT-10 is 210kg, up slightly on the R1S. Some years ago Yamaha seemed to have lost direction in the naked bike category. The company’s last attempt at a 1000cc naked bike, the FZ1, missed the mark but the MT-10 has been described as the “most remarkable naked bike to be developed by Yamaha so far”. When released, the MT-10 will enter an already busy market segment. It will compete for buyers with the Suzuki GSX-S1000, Kawasaki’s Z1000, the BMW S1000R, and Triumph’s new Speed Triple S. The official launch is expected in April, and the European market will be the first to get the MT-10 in May. The Australian release date and pricing are yet to be announced.

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Ducati MotoGP Official Launch

Ducati MotoGP Official Launch

So with much fanfare came the official launch of the Ducati MotoGP Team. The entire team and management were introduced to the under enthusiastic audience. The event was streamed online and one can only assume the bulk of the excitement was left to us viewing the event from afar. The main takeaways from the event were that the tyres are going to play a role in this years championship. The rubber has played a major part in everyone’s testing regime this year and as Andrea Dovizioso pointed out, the tyres have changed test to test meaning that the set up that worked previously was null and void come the latest test. In regards to the ECU several members of the t am pointed out that they have been using the unit on their satellite bikes for the past season so the introduction of the control into the factory teams came with no surprises. This could be an interesting factor in that Ducati still maintain a lot of control and involvement with their satellite t arms, more so that other manufacturers.    Then came the inevitable praise for their new “test rider”, Casey Stoner. After showing up the factory pilots at the first test the praise was well deserved. From his input it will be interesting to see what role this test rider can play. He did not ride at Philip Island, however he apparently played a large role of mentoring the factory riders and assessing the other manufacturers equipment, which of course he knows rather well (Honda that is).  The point that everyone their seemed to be making that this year showed real promise and the team seemed to grasp the opportunity that had been presented with the change in rules. I’m starting to get excited now. Bring on Qatar!

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Owners Warned To Stop Using Mirza Miniature Bikes

Owners Warned To Stop Using Mirza Miniature Bikes

Owners of Mirza Miniature road and dirt style motorcycles with model numbers SKD-PB06 and SKD-MD02 should immediately stop using the bike, according to advice from the ACCC. The braking system on the two Mirza models fails to meet Australian Consumer Standards. A recall notice has been issued by the ACCC for the Mirza SKD-PB06 and SKD-MD02 that advises that the “minibikes” do not comply with the requirements set out in Consumer Protection Notice No. 24 of 2011. There is a permanent ban on miniature motorbikes with unsafe design features. Non-conformities in the braking system may result in loss of control at speed, possibly causing serious injury or death. Affected motorcycles were sold in Victoria by DOMEIT PTY LTD and the ACCC says consumers should immediately stop using the “minibikes” and contact Domeit Pty Ltd to receive a full refund of the purchase price.

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